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Why do you only have to pay 10 percent of bail?

pay 10 percent of bail with 20 dollar bills

If you work with a bail bond agent to post bail, you’ll be required to pay around 10% of the total bail amount. This is due to California state mandates, and rates can only be negotiated in very specific terms.

Let’s take a look at what 10 percent of bail actually means and what other bail bond options are available.

What is 10 percent of bail?

When court assigns you a total bail amount, you can either post bail yourself or work with a bail bond agent. Since bail can be pretty high, most people can’t afford to post bail on their own. Because of this, many people seek out bail bond agents.

Bail bond agents usually require a 10% bail bond fee and collateral. Here’s a breakdown of this from the California Department of Insurance:

“Bail schedules vary greatly by offense and by county. In Sacramento County, the bail for a domestic violence charge is $5,000, the bail for second degree burglary is $10,000, the bail for battery with serious bodily injury is $50,000, and the bail for carjacking is $100,000. On average, a person is paying a bail agent 10% or less of the bail amount as premium, but they also sign over collateral, which can be a house, car, jewelry, etc.”

California Department of Insurance

This 10% fee is set by the California Department of Insurance. If a bail bond agent attempts to give you a lower percentage, you’ll need to confirm the legitimacy of the offer.

How do you calculate the 10 percent of bail fee?

If you want to figure out how much your bail bond fee will be, simply figure out what 10% of the total bail amount is. To do this, multiple the bail amount by 0.10.

For example, a bail of $25,000 would mean a bail bond fee of $2,500. A bail of $100,000 would mean a bail bond fee of $10,000.

Are there other bail payment options?

If you can’t afford the 10% bail bond fee, the bail bond company can sometimes provide you with other options. 

For example, some agents allow you to pay your bail bond fee with a credit card. As another example, some agents will offer you a payment plan. In this case, they’ll require a minimum down payment with monthly payments.

Have more questions about the bail bond process?

We’ve got you covered. We provide bail bond services throughout Kern County, and we’d love to help. Reach out to us online with any questions or check out our additional resources below.

Can you bail yourself out of jail with a credit card?

credit cards used to pay for bail

If you or a loved one is ever arrested, you might wonder, “Can you bail yourself out of jail with a credit card?”

This is a normal question to ask. Many people have multiple credit cards, which may have high credit limits. One or two of these credit cards might be able to make up the total bail amount, while your current savings account may not be able to do that.

However, depending on the city you’re arrested in, you may or may not be able to post bail with your credit cards. Very few institutions actually allow you to post bond with a credit card, and instead, they require a money order or cash. 

Keep Reading: What happens when you bail someone out of jail?

When can you post bail with a credit card?

If a credit card is your only option, you can seek out a bail bond agent instead. While not every bail bond agent will accept credit cards, many will. This has certainly changed over recent years, due to credit cards becoming a more normal and accepted means of payment.

Before this can happen, however, a bail bond agent may run a credit check and will likely require physical collateral on top of the bail bond fee payment.

There are some pros and cons to this. 

When you post bail with a bail bond agent, you’ll only be required to pay 10% of the total bail amount. This means that you’re more likely to be able to afford it. On top of this, many bail bond agents provide credit card payments and financing options. In other words, you can pay for the bond over time, instead of all at once. 

Keep in mind, though, this bond fee is never returned, while bail is returned. 

So let’s say that bail is $10,000 and you post bail directly to the court. When the court process is complete, the full $10,000 payment is returned to you in full. On the flip side of things, if you post bail through a bail bond agent and pay them a 10% fee of $1,000, you’ll never get that money back.

Keep Reading: Learn more about how to calculate the bail bond fee

Have more questions about the bail bond process?

We’ve got you covered. We provide bail bond services throughout Kern County, and we’d love to help. Reach out to us online with any questions or check out our additional resources below.

If bail is 250,000 how much do I pay?

man paying for bail

Bailing someone out of jail can be an overwhelming experience — especially if you’ve never dealt with the court system before. 

Where do you pay bail? How do you find a bail bond agent? How long does the process take?

You probably have a lot of unanswered questions, and you likely don’t know where to go to get them answered. This being said, one question that’s relatively easy to answer is how much of the bail amount you’re required to pay.

For example, if bail is 250,000, how much do you pay? Let’s break down this question into two parts.

Working with a bail bond agent

“If bail is $250,000 how much do I pay?” If you’re working with a bail bond agent in California, the answer to this question should be around $25,000. This is because a bail bond agent will charge you 10% of the total bail amount. 

This 10% fee is set by the state of California and is not negotiable. If another “bail bond agency” tries to charge you more or less, beware. This likely means they’re not licensed, or they’re not operating legally.

Keep in mind, there may be other fees involved during the bail bond process. However, these should always be disclosed to you up front, and they should never be a surprise.

Keep Reading: What is the purpose of a bail bond?

Posting bail on your own

On the flip side of things, if bail is $250,000 (and you’re posting bail without a bail bond agent), then you’ll need to pay the entire $250,000 to the court system. 

You might be wondering why anyone would want to do this — as opposed to only paying a 10% fee to a bail bond agency. To answer this question, you first need to understand that a bail bond fee is non-refundable — while total bail amount is. This means that if you pay bond on your own, you’ll get the full $250,000 refunded to you at the end of the court process. When you work with a bail bond agent, the $25,000 is not returned to you.

Keep Reading: Where does bail money go?

Do you have to pay the bond fee all at once?

If you decide to work with a bail bond agent, you may not be required to pay the 10% fee all at once. For example, some bail bond agencies will require at least a 5% fee payment and can establish a payment plan moving forward.

It’s important to do your research and find a bail bond agent that is willing to be flexible. 

Have more questions about the bail bond process?

We’ve got you covered. We provide bail bond services throughout Kern County, and we’d love to help. Reach out to us online with any questions or check out our additional resources below.

What happens if someone jumps bail and you’re the cosigner?

empty court room

Curious to know what happens if someone jumps bail and you’re the cosigner? Well, for starters, we hope this doesn’t happen to you. It’s a stressful and serious situation that can have lasting, negative impacts on both you and the defendant. 

Let’s take a quick look at what happens if a defendant jumps bail.

What happens with a failure to appear in court?

If a defendant jumps bail, they also forfeit their bail. If you’re the cosigner, this means you also forfeit any bail money you may have paid. This is technically known as a failure to appear in court, and it is a crime. The court will issue a warrant for the defendant’s arrest, and any fees or fines racked up during this period may become your responsibility.  

This being said, even though you’re financially responsible for bail, you will not be criminally charged with anything. So don’t worry — you’re not going to jail. 

What happens if you worked with a bail bond agent?

If you worked with a bail bond agent instead of posting bail directly to the court, you will still be held financially responsible for a failure to appear in court. 

On top of the additional fees and fines associated with finding the defendant, you may also end up losing valuable, personal property. When you sign for a bail bond, you may also use collateral as a way to secure the bond. This could be a vehicle, jewelry, or even a home. When a defendant jumps bail, this property could end up as the property of the bail bond company.

To make matters a little more stressful, you’ll also be responsible for helping the bail bond track down the defendant. In some cases, this could prove to be near impossible. 

Are you worried about a failure to appear in court?

A failure to appear in court is never a fun situation to deal with. This being said, it’s important to do everything you can to avoid it at all costs. Here’s what we suggest:

  • Never cosign for someone you don’t fully trust
  • Never offer up collateral that is vital to your day-to-day life (ex. your house or primary vehicle)
  • Always remain in close contact with the defendant
  • Always travel with the defendant to court
  • Work with a lawyer to excuse any unexpected absences 

Need help posting bail? We can help.

At Cowboy Bail Bonds, we have decades of experience helping people in Bakersfield and throughout Kern County post bail. If you have more questions about this process, give us a call or send us a message online.

Interested in learning more about bail bonds? Check out our resources below!

What happens when you bail someone out?

person in handcuffs

Wondering what happens when you bail someone out of jail? Then you’ve come to the right place. 

There are a few things you should know when you go through the bail process, including:

  • The options you have to post bail on behalf of a loved one
  • What the defendant is responsible for after posting bail
  • What happens to bail money after the court process is complete

Let’s break these down.

How can you post bail?

There are a few different ways you can post bail for a loved one. The two most common ways include paying the bail directly with cash or check OR working with a bail bond company. 

If you’re wondering which option is best for you, check out our article on whether or not bail bonds are worth it.

In some situations, the defendant may also be given the opportunity to sign for an Own Recognizance Bond (OR Bond). This does not require a temporary cash payment to the court, but only certain individuals and charges are approved for an OR Bond.

What happens after you post bail?

After you bail someone out of jail, everyone can go home! However, it’s important to remember that the defendant MUST return to jail on the assigned date. If they do not, a warrant for their arrest will be issued and the bail money will NOT be returned.

On top of this, there might be certain conditions that must be maintained by the defendant. For example, the defendant may be required to obey all laws, not partake in drugs, and avoid certain places or people.

What happens after the process is complete?

After the entire court process is complete, bail money will usually be returned back to the person who posted it. This is true whether the defendant is found innocent or guilty. 

However, if the defendant is found guilty, certain fees or fines may come out of the total bail amount. If you’re worried this might be the case with you, speak to your lawyer or the court. They’ll have all the information you need.

Need help posting bail? We can help.

At Cowboy Bail Bonds, we have decades of experience helping people in Bakersfield and throughout Kern County post bail. If you have more questions about this process, give us a call or send us a message online.

Interested in learning more about bail bonds? Check out our resources below!

What happens to bond money when charges are dropped?

gavel and bail money signature

If you’re wondering, “What happens to bond money when charges are dropped?”, you’re not alone. The bail bond process can be confusing, especially if you’ve never been around someone who’s been arrested before. 

But don’t worry. Once charges have been dropped, you’re in the clear. Here’s what you need to know.

Do you get your bail money back?

If charges have been dropped, you can start to relax. Not only will your loved one go free, but you’ll get your bail money back, too. The court will refund it in whole.

However, if you worked with a bail bond agent to post bail, the bail bond fee is non-refundable. This will not be returned to you. This is a bail bond agent’s fee for posting the full bail amount to court.

Related Content: How much do bail bond companies charge?

Do you get your bail money back if charges aren’t dropped?

If charges aren’t dropped and your loved one is found guilty of charges, you’ll still get your bail money back.

Bail is not a way for the court system to make money. It’s simply a way to make sure defendants return back to court. Because of this, bail money is refunded in whole once the bail bond process is complete.

What happens if you don’t receive bail money back?

If a defendant is found guilty of charges, there may be court fees and fines associated with their charge. When this happens, it’s a possibility that this amount will be taken directly out of your bail fee. 

Contact the court if you’re worried this might be the case. They can walk you through the fees and fines and explain when (or if) you’ll be receiving any refund.

How is bail money returned?

If charges are dropped or the court process has concluded, the court system will refund bail by mailing a check. This could take over a month, so you’ll need to be patient.

This being said, if you’re concerned with your refund, contact the court system. They should have all the information you need to figure out what’s going on with your bail money.

Need help posting bail? We can help.

At Cowboy Bail Bonds, we have decades of experience helping people in Bakersfield and throughout Kern County post bail. If you have more questions about this process, give us a call or send us a message online.

Interested in learning more about bail bonds? Check out our resources below!

What is the purpose of a bail bond?

bail money and calculator

The purpose of a bail bond is to help a defendant post bail. Once the defendant posts bail, they can leave jail and return home until their assigned court date. Although a defendant can post bail on their own or with the help of a loved one, bail is usually too expensive to afford. Therefore, they seek out the help of a bail bond agent. 

There are a variety of factors involved when seeking out a bail bond. Here are the most important factors you should know:

  • To get a bail bond, there is a fee required. In California, this fee is 10% of the total bail amount. If a bail bond agent says they can charge you less than the 10% fee, be cautious.
  • The bail bond fee is non refundable — this is how a bail bond agent is able to provide this service to individuals. Even if the defendant is found innocent of the crime, you will not be refunded the bail bond fee.
  • If you seek out a bail bond, collateral will need to be considered. This collateral should make up the total bail amount (minus the bail bond fee). 
  • If the defendant does not return to court on the assigned date, your collateral might be taken by the bail bond agent. Therefore, it’s important to fully trust the defendant before signing for a bail bond.
  • In some cases, it is possible to remove your name from a bail bond. You will need to review the paperwork completely before signing to make sure this is part of the parameters. If it is, there may be another fee required.

Interested in learning more about bail bonds? 

At Cowboy Bail Bonds, we have decades of experience helping people in Bakersfield and throughout Kern County post bail. If you have more questions about this process, give us a call or send us a message online. Or, check out our additional bail bond resources below!

How do you get your name off someone’s bail bond?

A book about judges

If you’ve helped someone post bail, it is possible to get your name off the bail bond. However, there are a few things you’ll need to be aware of — including potential fees and the future of the defendant. 

Let’s take a look at how you can remove your name from someone’s bail bond and what this means for you and the defendant.

What to know about removing yourself from a bail bond

First things first, not all bail bond agreements allow for you to remove yourself from a bail bond. This being said, you will need to contact your bail bond agent to see if removing yourself from the bail bond is even an option. In future situations, this should be a question you ask during the initial bail bond process.

If you are able to remove yourself from the bail bond, then you should know that — in nearly every situation — you will not get the bail bond fee returned. The purpose of revoking your name from a bail bond should not be to get your fee money back. Instead, it should be because you feel like your trust in the defendant is not as strong as it once was. 

For example, if you feel as if the defendant will skip their upcoming court date, then this is a very good reason to contact the bail bond agent and to get yourself removed from the bail bond.

If the bail bond agent agrees, then they will inform the court of the bail bond status and the defendant will be required to return to jail. At this point, the defendant will be required to remain in jail until or if they can post bail by other means. The bail bond agent may also charge a fee for the removal process. This fee should be disclosed up front in your contract or during the bail bond application process.

Have more questions about bail bonds?

At Cowboy Bail Bonds, we have decades of experience helping people in Bakersfield and throughout Kern County post bail. If you have more questions about this process, give us a call or send us a message online. Or, check out our additional bail bond resources below!

Where does bail money go?

Coins in front of clock.

Where does bail money go? After you’ve provided the court with the full bail amount, the bail money is held by the court. The money is held only temporarily since bail money is returned to the defendant after the trial process is over. This is true even if the defendant is found to be guilty of the charges.

However, if the defendant fails to appear in court, the bail money is no longer held temporarily. Instead, the court will seize the bail money and not return it. It is then distributed throughout the city and county as the court sees fit.

This being said, if you are posting bail on behalf of a family member or friend, you need to make sure that you fully trust this individual to return to court on the required date(s). If you can’t trust this individual, you may want to reconsider posting bail on their behalf. 

Keep in mind, this is also true if you work to post bail with the help of a bail bondsman. Even though a bail bond company will post bail for you and you are only required to pay a 10% fee, you are still on the hook for the total bail amount. This will be clearly notated somewhere in your bail bond contract, and you will be asked to provide collateral as a result (which can be homes, cars, jewelry, or other valuable items). If your loved one does not return to court, the bail bond company can seize your listed collateral.

Need help posting bail?

At Cowboy Bail Bonds, we provide bail bond services in Bakersfield and throughout Kern County. If you have questions about how or when to post bail, give us a call or send us a message. We’d love to help.

In the meantime, check out our additional bail bond resources to learn more about the bail bond process:

How to get DUI bail bonds and post bail fast

bail bonds agent writing on a document

If a loved one has been hit with a DUI and you’re researching DUI bail bonds, rest easy knowing the process is no different than any other bail bond. 

However, if you’re not familiar with bail bonds, then you should know that the bail bond process itself is not complicated. And depending on your bail bond agent, the process can be rather quick and painless.

Let’s take a look at DUI bail bonds and what your next steps should be.

What you should know about DUI bail bonds

If your loved one is facing a first-time DUI charge with no serious injuries or damage involved, then the total bail amount should be relatively low. In fact it could be as low as $2,000 (and in some cases, as low as $500).

If this is the case, a bail bond might not be the right move for you. Take a look at our blog detailing when and why you should pay bail on your own rather than seeking out a bond.

However, in other more serious DUI incidents, you could be facing a total bail amount that’s anywhere between $5,000 and $50,000. In these situations, most people will require help from a bail bond agent.

At this point, your first step should be to contact a local bail bond company. They’ll take over the process from there. In fact, after you’ve signed the bail bond paperwork and paid the bail bond fee (which is usually around 10% of the total bail amount in California), then you’re done. The bail bond agent will take care of the rest.

Learn more: How much of a bond do you have to pay?

Afterward, your loved one will be responsible for returning to the court on the assigned date. If convicted of the DUI, more requirements can follow, such as jail time, fines, license suspension, community service, and more.

Additional resources for DUI bail bonds: